March 31, 2020

Losing Streak: How One Score Games Create a “Winning” School Culture

“I”

“I”

“I believe”

“I believe” 

“I believe that we will”

“I believe that we will score”

“I believe that we will score”

“I believe that we will score”

A chant all too often repeated by the student section during packed Friday night football games at Carson Park, above the sound of the pep band, cheering parents, and half of the student section at the concession stand. Although North’s football season has wound down and winter sports are on the brink of being in full swing, the effects of “Football Fever” are seen at North year round.

“Championship” is a word sometimes used to describe the atmosphere surrounding sports culture at North. However, the general consensus among the North student body is that we hold a “Losing Culture” to our name, mostly off the field. This losing culture is the template for a decrease in morale or spirit, and general attitude at school. This lack of spirit and respect, contrasted with the lack thereof, is reflected upon conversations in the halls, interactions with students, and even the balance of social groups at school. A senior, who would like to remain anonymous, says that they are “embarrassed” to be at school sometimes because of how “cliquey” people at North can be. They also explain how “This false sense of school pride can be taken the wrong way.This control over social hierarchy is a direct result of the complex, angst driven, “Losing Culture” at north. However, not all hope has been lost for our football team

However, on the field, the student section always comes out in droves for our boys in blue, despite the preconceived notion that they will lose the game on that particular night. This is mostly because the sport of football, being the beloved American tradition that it is, always never fails to be a source of congregation for fun and spirit for everyone involved. This “American Dream” esque football game is typically the sight of friday nights gone by at Carson Park. Upon further analysis into the culture surrounding the games, it is found that the culture is somewhat ironic in nature. Ironic in the sense that with a team that doesn’t always win, one would think the school games would be tarnished with boos and obscenities. Although these phrases are still repeated, they are overshadowed by an abundance of optimism from the student section. Although not every person in that student section is certain the team is going to win, it only brings them closer together in spirit. 

So the next time you’re at a North football game, think not of what you’ve heard about them in the halls, but go to the game, experience the cheers, whistles and enthusiasm of a “Losing Culture” and ask yourself, do you believe that we will win?

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